Connect with us

Science News

New calculator provides the risk of complications and death for diabetics and obese patients.

Published

on

A group of researchers presented a new calculator at the 36th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery (ASMBS) that predicts the risk of death for people with diabetes and obesity. According to a press release, this new calculator “can accurately predict the chances that a Type 2 diabetic and obese patient will die or may develop serious complications, including heart attack, heart failure and diabetic kidney disease (nephropathy)” within the next 10 years of computation.

According to a new study, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, obese patients who undergo a metabolic operation, a procedure which may include operations such as gastrectomy or gastric bypass, have better results than those who undergo ‘traditional’ medical therapies to improve type 2 diabetes and reduce the risk of heart attack, stroke or other cardiovascular events. In particular, scientists noted that patients undergoing metabolic surgery were 39% less likely to have heart complications, cerebral strokes or diabetic complications, while 41% were less likely to die from any cause.

Researchers analyzed data from 13,722 patients with type 2 diabetes or obesity, 2,287 of whom underwent metabolic surgery and the remainder underwent standard treatment. Using statistical analysis and computer-aided automatic learning, the researchers created a model for predicting these events in a new risk calculator that provides a result of more than 10 years depending on whether the patient continues with current treatment or is undergoing metabolic surgery. The calculator examines several other factors.

According to Ali Aminian, Principal Investigator and Bariatric Surgeon and Professor of Surgery at Cleveland Clinic, this calculator “can better inform about therapeutic decisions and doctor’s recommendations and, hopefully, can lead to improved care and treatment outcomes for patients.”


Related Articles and Sources:

https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2019-11/asfm-wcp110419.php

Image Credit:

https://e3.365dm.com/19/08/2048×1152/2371908060834020707_4737709.jpg

Jane Baker

An established and well-respected journalist, Jane worked for The Pueblo Chieftain (chieftain.com) as an editor for many years and holds an undergraduate degree in Molecular Biology from the University of Northern Colorado. In her free time she enjoys motorcycling, hiking and reading. She is largely responsible for assisting with research and writing new stories relating to new medical research.

1387 Berry Street, Saguache Colorado, 81149
719-655-0938
Jane@abc14news.com
Jane Baker
Continue Reading

Science News

Drones that can see from 150 meters high used in Scotland to find missing persons.

Published

on

The Scottish police are starting to use a new drone system integrated with artificial intelligence, called the Remote Control Aircraft System (RPAS), to detect a person by facial recognition from a distance of up to 150 meters. The system, equipped with advanced cameras and neural computer networks, can actually identify a person, including movement, by recognizing facial features and comparing them with images in a database.

At present, this system is mainly used to search for missing persons or, in any case, for persons who need help or have been lost, as explained by Nicholas Whyte, one of the heads of the Scottish Air Support Unit, who makes some statements about this advanced system on the BBC website. The data collected by the drones are processed in real-time, and the recognition software, which is remotely activated, can distinguish between everything from a person, through an animal, to a vehicle with its license plate, even when these objects are in motion.

To train the software, managers have used hundreds of hours of footage from the same police officers in different contexts, locations and situations. Moreover, the software itself “does not require advanced supercomputers” because Professor Carl Schaschke, a researcher from the University of West Scotland, one of the institutions that worked with the Scottish police to develop this technology, indicates that even a trivial smartphone is sufficient to manage the software. The same system also requires only two police officers to manage one drone, one to pilot it and the other to use recognition software.

At the moment, Scottish political leaders have distributed three drones to be used across Scotland, and the formal launch of the system should take place on Thursday. Of course, such technology, with these particular features, raises concerns about all privacy and civil liberties issues, but the Scottish leaders themselves suggest that it is not a spy drone, but only a ‘police tool’ to help and find people.


Related Articles and Sources:

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-scotland-50262650

Image Credit:

https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71Ao-WrjMDL._SL1500_.jpg

Jane Baker

An established and well-respected journalist, Jane worked for The Pueblo Chieftain (chieftain.com) as an editor for many years and holds an undergraduate degree in Molecular Biology from the University of Northern Colorado. In her free time she enjoys motorcycling, hiking and reading. She is largely responsible for assisting with research and writing new stories relating to new medical research.

1387 Berry Street, Saguache Colorado, 81149
719-655-0938
Jane@abc14news.com
Jane Baker
Continue Reading

Science News

A fossil of a huge sea monster from 150 million years ago, a pliosaurus, was found in Poland

Published

on

A fossil of what phys.org calls the “150 millionth sea monster” was found by two researchers from the Polish Academy of Sciences. Daniel Tyborowski and Błażej Błażejowski found a fossil in a wheat field near the village of Krzyżanowice. It is a pliosaurus fossil (Pliosauroidea), a marine reptile that lived in Jurassic and Cretaceous areas and had a large head and a generally large body and very massive toothed jaws.

The fossil is about 10 meters long and according to researchers belongs to the pliosaurus, which lived from 145 to 163 million years ago. Apart from being the first pliosaurus fossil in Poland, this fossil opened the way to other fossil remains of various other nearby creatures, including ancient crocodiles and turtles. According to researchers, this area used to be a tropical environment with many animals, perhaps created by an archipelago with lagoons and various small pools, almost ideal for all kinds of reptiles.

Hungry reptiles were hungry reptiles: there were several species and almost all of them were at the top of their food chains. In the millions of years in which they have existed, they have reached enormous proportions with some specimens that could be similar in size to those of modern plowing. They were very long and relatively narrow with a crocodile-like muzzle, with massive teeth and large fins. According to the researchers, they fed on almost every living animal they could find in this environment, from the reptiles themselves to the mammals that might have emerged in search of water food near them.

Researchers believe that there are still other interesting fossils to be found in the area, which is why they continue to work in the area.


Related Articles and Sources:

https://phys.org/news/2019-11-million-year-old-sea-monster-fossil-poland.html

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0016787819301063?via%3Dihub

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-7629681/Bones-30-foot-long-Jurassic-sea-monster-massive-jaws-cornfield-Poland.html

https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pliosauroidea

Image Credit:

http://cdn.sci-news.com/images/enlarge3/image_4892e-Luskhan-itilensis.jpg

Jane Baker

An established and well-respected journalist, Jane worked for The Pueblo Chieftain (chieftain.com) as an editor for many years and holds an undergraduate degree in Molecular Biology from the University of Northern Colorado. In her free time she enjoys motorcycling, hiking and reading. She is largely responsible for assisting with research and writing new stories relating to new medical research.

1387 Berry Street, Saguache Colorado, 81149
719-655-0938
Jane@abc14news.com
Jane Baker
Continue Reading

Science News

Microbial skin protects sharks from infection as a result of wounds

Published

on

Microbials, i.e. groups of bacteria and microorganisms living in the body (or above it in the case of skin microorganisms), are not only very important for humans but also for animals, as confirmed by further research. This time, scientists from the Red Sea Research Centre of the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) investigated the microbiological communities living on saithe shark skin (Carcharhinus melanopterus).

It has happened several times that those who study these sharks have observed them with noticeable wounds on their bodies, but almost never with signs of infection around the wounds themselves. To understand this phenomenon, an international team of researchers collected various samples of skin mucus from the backs and gills of sloe sharks living around Seychelles, namely around the Amirante Islands. In addition, they sequenced RNA genes to identify bacteria.

As Claudia Pogoreutz explains, one of the researchers who conducted the study, the researchers found no signs of infection around the wounds. This suggests that the skin of these sharks is not readily infective and that it is the bacterial communities, precisely those on the skin, that are the main reason: “We really need to investigate the bacterial functions and innate immunity of sharks to understand what really happens and how wound healing in sharks is mediated,” says the researcher in a press release presenting the research that has emerged in the Animal Microbiome.

Scientists have also found differences in the bacterial communities of shark skin depending on where he lived, even when he was only a few miles away, but relatively isolated. According to scientists, these differences are dictated by the environmental conditions in which these sharks live, by conditions that may vary, such as temperature, population density, nutrient availability and water pollution levels.

Pogoreutz herself suggests that there are still many things to understand with regard to shark skin micro-organisms.


Related Articles and Sources:

https://animalmicrobiome.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s42523-019-0011-5

Image Credit:

https://i.ytimg.com/vi/EP8MjFiUSbM/maxresdefault.jpg

Jane Baker

An established and well-respected journalist, Jane worked for The Pueblo Chieftain (chieftain.com) as an editor for many years and holds an undergraduate degree in Molecular Biology from the University of Northern Colorado. In her free time she enjoys motorcycling, hiking and reading. She is largely responsible for assisting with research and writing new stories relating to new medical research.

1387 Berry Street, Saguache Colorado, 81149
719-655-0938
Jane@abc14news.com
Jane Baker
Continue Reading

Support ABC 14 News

If you enjoy our reporting, please consider a small donation via PayPal to donations@abc14news.com - even a small amount of $5 or $10 will help out significantly with our hosting costs. You can also share our articles on Facebook, Reddit and Twitter. Also make sure to sign up to our newsletter to get notified whenever we publish a new article.

Trending